The Canadian government continues to make brain related research a priority, recently announcing that 32 brain-related research initiatives will be funded through the Canada Brain Research Fund.   These innovative projects seek to expand the understanding of the brain, identify new and better ways of diagnosing brain related illness and injury, and seek new ways to support and treat brain-related diseases like dementia.

Canadian Government Continues to Make Brain Related Research a Priority“Dementia and other brain-related illnesses are a concern for an aging society like our own, and that is why the federal government continues to make dementia and other brain related illnesses a priority.

On Sept. 12, my colleague Rona Ambrose, minister of health, along with Inez Jabalpurwala, president and CEO of Brain Canada, announced 32 projects being funded under the Canada Brain Research Fund.

Our government’s continued focus on brain-related illnesses will no doubt be good news to folks like Maribeth Friesen, CEO of the Okanagan’s BrainTrust Canada and Nigel Brown, executive director of Sing for Your Life Foundation BC, who along with many others work tirelessly to improve the lives of those with a brain illness or injury and support activities that help prevent diseases like dementia.

The projects will accelerate innovative research that will advance our knowledge of and support the development of new ways to diagnose and treat all types of neurological and mental illnesses.

Following up on commitments made during the Global Dementia Legacy Event held in Ottawa Sept. 11-12, three of the projects will explore neurodegeneration.

Most recently, Budget 2014 announced $15 million per year to the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, for the expansion of the Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research, the creation of the Canadian Consortium on Neurodegeneration in Aging, and other health research priorities.

With the CCNA initiative, Canada is joining forces with its G7 counterparts to support additional research with a view to finding a cure for dementia by 2025.

Funding for all 32 projects totals nearly $51.4 million, half provided by the Government of Canada and half provided by private donors, research institutions, provincial funding agencies, and charitable organizations partnering with the Brain Canada Foundation.

Our government recognizes the very real impact that neurological and mental health conditions have on Canadian families. Between 2006 and 2013, we have invested more than $861 million in neuroscience research through the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

We are proud to support innovative new projects devoted to neurological and mental health research that will help to advance our knowledge on neurological and mental health.”

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